Posts tagged Summicron 35mm

Low light…

Last sunday Jacqueline Govaert performed a try out gig in “De Vijfhoek”, a small and low lit bar in my hometown Haarlem. The music was fantastic and moving. Beautiful, small, acoustic songs behind the piano supported by two ladies on backing vocals. Of course I brought the Monochrom again, but this time… it was tough. Most of the small acoustic set took place behind the piano, so Jacqueline was sitting in almost dark. Besides that it was packed, so there was very little space to move. 

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In the end I got a spot very near the piano, which I needed with only a 35mm on me. Luckily the Monochrom (as all Leica M cameras) is very quiet, so I didn’t disturb the concert. I had to shoot at 6400 ISO and still I had to shoot at 1/15 or 1/30 sec at f2.0. Some shots still came out a bit dark and, as you probably know, if you try to fix something like that in LR you’ll get noise… in some cases quite a lot. But I really liked the shots, so I decided not to try and get rid of the noise but put in extra grain in Silver Effex pro. Luckily it had exactly the right results. Now I had some very atmospheric shots, subsidiary to the beautiful songs of Jacqueline. Hope you’ll like them. 

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Finally, it’s there. It took some time, my patience was tested to it’s very limits, but now it’s finally there: The Leica M240.

I had tried it about a month ago, courtesy of Transcontinenta - the importer of Leica in the Netherlands- during the world justice forum in The Hague. A perfect place to test it, because the new M is already the standard in American court due to its silent shutter release. 

It was a great opportunity to test it, as many of the conference halls were quite dark to work in. So cranking it up to 1600 ISO was a necessity in many accessions. And it worked, it worked very well. I loved the colours coming straight from the camera and the resolution is amazing.

I really had to get used to the new buttons on the back though. Half of the time I wanted to have a quick playback, I immediately ended up in live view mode. And the fact that the info button is now on the other side took some getting used to as well. 

Still I’m very happy. For one, I can actually see what I’m doing now. As the LCD is finally giving some proper image and some higher resolution feedback on what I’m doing.

So the actual transition has happened. All my Nikon gear is for sell (most of it already sold even) and from now on I will be using either this beautiful monster or its sibling the Monochrom. Having “only” a Summicron 35mm and a Summicron 50mm and these two babies in my bag makes me the happiest person alive.  

The life of an activist

I take photographs to understand. To observe a world that is unknown to me. To look at situations I’ve never been in. 
So when I got the opportunity to photograph 5 days out of the life of an activist, I jumped at the occasion. And what an opportunity this was: shadowing the director of Greenpeace International, Kumi Naidoo, for 5 days in Istanbul, while he was attending the Global Power Shift conference, meeting with journalists and marching through the streets of Istanbul, raising awareness about how the fossil fuel threatens the climate and environment. And all of this, only weeks after the Gezi protests sparked unrest in the entire Turkey.

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Greenpeace Turkey’s staff and volunteers were involved in the initial protest against the demolition of Gezi park, one of the only remaining green areas in the vast city of Istanbul. We also joined a protest to commemorate all the people that were killed in Turkey during the past few weeks.

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Now, looking back at it, I can honestly say: ”That man is a machine”. And I mean that in the most respectful way I can possibly think of. Imagine a work day that starts early in the morning and doesn’t end until the night comes, seven days a week, for a cause he so strongly believes in. And imagine that there is rarely a glimpse of tiredness to be seen. Every person he meets, every group he addresses, every interview he gives, is with warmth, contact, focus and attention. One late night he started a conference call and was on for several hours, just as I went to my hotel room to sleep. I just couldn’t keep up.

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In the quick moments between meetings, he makes calls, deliberates with his colleagues, or listens to spoken Turkish words on his phone so that he will pronounce them the right way when speaking at the rally we were going to.

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I’m aware of my special position. Everyone who meets this man, gets a certain amount of time, dedicated specially to them. After that, he’s gone and you have no idea what he is going to do next. This man lives in a constant hyper focus with the ability to convey what his vision of a better world is. I got to see, up close and personal, how this man shifts between tone and the words, often explaining the same issues. To 20 volunteers, the message has to be brought differently than on a live TV program for the Turkish public. But the message is the same: a better world is possible. The intensity is overwhelming each time, and it was empowering to see how one person can inspire so many.      

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Taksim, Istanbul

So here I am, in Istanbul. Not to capture the events on Taskim Square, but to shadow the head of Greenpeace, mister Kumi Naidoo. He will be attending the conference of the Global Power Shift.

Still, I’ll meet him tomorrow, so tonight I did go to Taskim square. What else would you do ;-) As I was still carying my luggage, looking for my hotel, I didn’t make a lot of photos on arrival. But I did take a few, because the amount of police there was overwhelming.

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Tonight I went back and I took some more. A perfect moment to check out the high ISO settings (2000) on the Monochrom, combined with a 1/30 or less shutter speed and an apperture of f2.0. I have to say… it delivered. 

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Luckily there wasn’t to much action, otherwise the slow shutter speed would have been a problem. Actually it was quite interesting to see some people demonstrating, police joking around with each other and venders trying to sell their food and balloon swards. Kind of surreal. And so very busy even on a Tuesday night at 23.30 h

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Tomorrow the day will start early. I’ll keep you posted here at this blog and at my facebook page.  For more photos you can also check my Flickr account.

The Monochrom

Back home for nearly two weeks, it’s time to look back at a wonderful trip. Because I had to return the Monochrom to Transcontinenta BV, who very kindly supported me with the camera for this long experiment, I would like to look back at working with this wonderful camera.

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It felt like a crazy decision at first, going to the land of colour with an all black & white camera. And the first month I did have some doubts. I even turned back to the M9 some times. Which I only brought with me as a backup. But during the trip I fell in love with the camera. By now, I actually don’t see a reason not to switch from the M9 to the Monochrom. In these two weeks back home, I think I’ve figured out why this B&W camera got to me. Some of the questions and remarks I had on my blogs and facebookpage, helped me discover this. Thank you for that!

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As I told you in an earlier blog, I use my camera to interact with the people I meet or to cope with the situations I’m in. I use a lot of energy connecting with my subjects. I have figured out that the Monochrom helps me to safe more energy. The way it does that, is taking away choices. 

When I was shopping in the Netherlands for the first time in 5 months, I suddenly realised that making a choice, does cost me energy. In India, shopping for cornflakes, will give you cornflakes. There’s only one kind. (if they have any at all!) Here in the Netherlands, it takes me 5 minutes to figure out which cornflakes to take and then I have to choose if I want a small package or a large one. Same happens when buying the milk to go along with it. It takes time, and therefor energy to make such decisions.

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With photography it’s the same thing. Most “modern” cameras have so many options I don’t know where to start. Specially when the camera is equipped with a 24-70 mm zoom. With the Monochrom and its 35 mm Summicron, there is very little choice. Actually there’s close to none. This camera is as basic as they come. Therefor all my energy can be spend with the subject of my picture.

That said, I did have to become a craftsman before I could use this camera in such way. The technique had to be ingrained in my hands and in my mind. Luckily I had done so in the past two years with the Leica M9. Now I’m shooting the same way as I did when I started photography: Instinctively. The only difference is that now, I know what I’m doing, so I can work with a minimum in choice and a maximum in quality (camera) and knowledge (technique). 

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The Black & White aspect is another important aspect of why I love this new Leica. In the same blog I referred to before, there’s another reason why I take pictures. I need to observe. I need to step away from the story to actually see the bigger picture. For me personally, colour distracts me from the story. Whenever I see a picture in colour, the first thing I see is colour, vibrance (or lack of) and contrast. When I look at a monochrome picture, the first thing I see is a story. To me there’s only one exception to this and that is when colour or it’s vibrance, ís telling me the actual story.

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Of course I could also “sell” the camera with it’s toning, beautiful sharpness, it’s dynamic range etc etc. But every advertorial or advert will tell you this. For me personal this is not that important. A camera is good or it’s not. What’s most important for me, is that it lets me do what I like to do the most: Get to know the world and tell my stories as I see them. 

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If you would like to see more of the pictures, check my facebook page or Flickr sets

create opportunity…

So Bangkok just didn’t really work for me, even though I wanted it to. It just wasn’t the time. A train ticket to Ayutthaya would help me ease the pain… I thought. Unfortunately in the start, it didn’t. This place is full of old temples and is lovely to ride through on a rented bicycle, but it didn’t really give me the inspiration that I was looking for. At the moment it is about 40 degrees Celsius which keeps most people inside or in the shadows doing nothing.

So I decided to do the same. Give in to the fact that it just wasn’t going to happen and lie down with a book in the shade. Second day, just to have a break from lying down, I decided to take a short walk. Not intending to take any pictures or look for any interesting situations. There it was… a huge tent, filled with Thai people, a boxing ring in the middle and banners hanging down, shouting: “Muay Thai Boxing Championship.” There was no hesitation, no doubt, this I needed to see. This needed my Monochrom to get out of the bag and work. 

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I found out, shooting sports with a rangefinder is hard. I needed to shift my thinking. The movement of the boxers was to quick to keep up manual focus. Luckily I knew I could push the MM to ISO 640 without getting noise or quality loss. This way I could close down my aperture a bit ( to f8.0), to ensure that the movement of the boxers wouldn’t immediately mean my picture would be out of focus. Using the zone focus scale on top of my lens gave me the opportunity to focus on framing and the actual action. More important I could do it without loosing any speed. And that’s what I needed: speed. These athletes were ferocious, quick and all over the place.

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I walked up to the ring and maneuvered myself into the corner where one of the boxers would be patched up every break between rounds. I was only send away once, as I nearly sat down on one of the referees lap, but I was virtually hanging inside the ring most of the time. Very necessary because a 35mm Summicron is a great lens, my favorite, but you’ll have to get in close and I didn’t want to crop (to much) afterwards.

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Looking back at the results, again I’m so happy with the Leica MM. It again delivered above my expectation. And one thing I’m quite sure of: the pictures are completely different from the ones taken by all the photographers that were there using their highspeed dSLRs with mega zooms and flashes (!?).

To see the whole series you can check my facebook page or the Flickr slideshow

Out of the city

Most of the time when traveling, I find myself going from city to town and back to a city again. Sometimes I almost forget there’s more than that.  When I hired a little motor bike and just cruised out of the town Pushkar, I noticed everything changed. Landscape, there’s no surprise, but also the contact with the people I met along the way.

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There was no hassle, asking for money or trying to sell me anything anymore. People were open and friendly, inviting and very photo genetic. I wrote a blog a while ago, about sending a private driver back home and taking the bus between destinations. I’m still very happy i did, but after a day driving around on my little moped, I guess next time I’ll be traveling with a drivers license for a motorbike. That way I can buy myself a cheap motor and travel the country on my own. Bringing only my small Leica kit - same as I have with me now - and some necessities like underware, there will be no trouble with luggage and it will bring me at places I’ll otherwise won’t see.

So, at least I have found my reason to stay traveling and go back to beautiful India again and again! ;-)

If you like to see these pictures and some more in higher resolution, check my Flickr account

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Selection…

As the albums on my Flickr page and my facebook are starting to become a bit abundant, I decided to start selecting a bit stricter.  Also I decided to delete some of the pictures in my facebook albums. Not that they are bad, but some others are just a better and in the end you only want to keep the best.

For me it’s one of the hardest things to do: “killing your darlings”. Especially because they are not only my darlings, they are also part of my journey. Of course I don’t throw them away, But in the end nobody wants to relive the hours and hours you spend behind a projector at your grandparents. And nobody really wants to see the wedding book with 750 pictures of your uncle dancing the cha cha cha or your nephew spoiling tomato soup on his mini smoking. Most of the time 50 pictures is enough, after that, attention most of the time decreases rapidly.  Often less is more, so choices must me made.

What makes me decide which picture stays in and which one goes, is hard to tell. Most of the time it’s a gut feeling. It’s easy to select the ones that have to stay in for sure. The diamonds. Thing is; if I only leave those, I’ll end up posting maybe 5 pictures out of all (not each) albums. I’d like to think I’m my most critical judge. So after selecting these I go on.

I try to look at the balance in my story. I can have ten women sitting in their door opening, but I only need one. Again everything is just a gut feeling. Which woman gives me the feeling I can’t leave her out. Because of the way she looks, or her colorful sari or the beautiful woodwork of the doorposts.  Looking at the light, composition, technique is another way to get rid of some of my babies. Even though sometimes it’s the one that breaks all the rules that stays in. Just because the “feel” is right.

In the end it’s all just a matter of taste. Which ones do I like the most? Which ones give me the uncontrollable urge to show them to the rest of the world? Which ones do I think people like to talk about? Which ones do I think tell the story?

Luckily, here I can make a separation again. Here on my blog, I tell you how I work and what problems I encounter. I show you some of the shots that either clarify my story or some that I just think you should really see. At my facebook page, I now show you the ones that I really think are good. This differs from time to time. I add pictures and I take some of. Same goes for my website, only on my facebook, I also give you updates about the trip, some behind the scene photos and every now and again a link that I think you should check. On my Flickr account I post a lot more. This is the place where people tend to go to browse pictures, just like they browse youtube for videos. So make your pick, or check them all… Hope you like what you see!

 

 

Change of heart…

Sitting in a car heading for Rajasthan, I had the feeling that I had made a wrong decision. It’s a great way to travel through Rajasthan -the part of India I’m traveling now - but it’s just not me. I need to be amongst the people.

Not exactly sure what it was that made me feel this way I endured a little bit longer. I don’t mind changing my mind all of a sudden, but I do want to know why I change it. It wasn’t the driver. Even though his English was very poor, he was very polite and he had no problem taking me wherever I wanted. This was the reason I took the car in the first place. The idea of not planning a train ahead, being able to stop at every location on my way sounded very appealing and practical for my photography. A flat tire even gave me a sudden feel of adventure, although it was solved quickly.

 

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I think it was the fact that everything was going smooth. To smooth. He took me from city to city, hotel to hotel. The hotels were good, even though they had weddings going on with loud music, had good restaurants and great rooms. The driver used B routes so there was plenty to see during our long drives. It was perfect and easy.

 

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I think my decision is best compared with the Leica I’m working with. The driver and his fancy hotels were like my old Nikons on program mode. Everything was great, effortless and without trouble. But if I compare the pictures I took with my DSLR while traveling, they tend to have a lack of story. They are good photos but they miss some sort of depth.

 

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If I read back the blogs about the time I started with the Leica M9 in Cuba, I struggled. But it’s that struggle that made the journey. It’s the cursing and the discomfort that makes me want to see and learn more. My first trip in India was a 37 hour bus-ride to Kashmere and I remember vividly how things looked, smelt and how I was feeling at the time. Now, nearly 2 months later, it has been one of the best parts of my trip. Maybe not photography wise , but definitely when it comes down to traveling India. Of course I did take some pictures in the towns that the car had dropped me. This is something I can do where ever I am, and independent of how I got there. A few I’ve posted here and the rest is on my fb page or at my Flickr page. I even grabbed the Leica M9 a couple of times instead of the Monochrom. Not because I was doubting, like I did before, but because I like to change things up every now and again.

 

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After two days in the car, I send the driver back to Delhi and booked myself on a train from Bikaner to Jodpur. Instead of traveling through Radjashan in a car for the upcoming two weeks, I’ll be struggling and cursing while booking train-tickets. There will be families cramped up against me in a bus, little children that follow me around through the streets and beggars asking me for money. And I’m looking forward to it!

 

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