Posts tagged monochrom

One more week…

It has been a while… It’s getting harder to write about stuff when, in my own perception, not much is happening…. yet!

At this moment, there are things happening. My trip to South Sudan en Uganda is about to commence, only five more days before take off. It’s unreal how much preparation this trip has asked and still is taking. Because of the conflict situation there, things are different for insurance, there’s a security protocol you have to know, different visa’s to obtain etc etc. I truly believe that this is a lot to take in, because it’s the first time I’m flying into conflict territory. I haven’t felt so excited/anxious going on a photography trip for a long time. 

PAX for peace is the organisation that is helping me out a lot. With preparation, getting there and with having some reliable people over there that I can depend on and that will help me with my project. Besides working on the Serous Request project “sexual violence in conflict area”, I’ll also be doing some work for PAX, documenting some of the work they do over there. 

Yesterday I was at Transcontinenta, getting some extra memory cards and extra batteries and they helped me out with a sweet 24mm Summilux lens to take with me as well for this trip. I hope to put this one in good use. Of course I’ll be mainly working in monochrome again, but I’ll probably will use the M and EVF2 combination a lot. As the 24 mm Summilux has a slightly wider angle than my optical viewfinder can show me, this is probably the best way to have the most control over my framing.

I also had a long talk with Femke and Ilse who just came back from South Susan. Their company is shooting a documentary there and they had some valuable tips and contacts for me. One of the things that surprised me a lot is the fact they explained to me that bringing a small camera, could this time actually be a con instead of a pro. Because of the small camera you’ll have to work harder for them to take you seriously as a journalist. Which is less practical in an area where people want to tell their story so it can get out. ( in any other situation I love the fact that people think I’m just a tourist, it gives me the freedom to walk around and just go for it.) Any way, it’s going to be interesting to see how that works out.

All in all, I’ve prepared as much as I can and I’m ready as I’ll ever be. I am looking forward having a very interesting month with beautiful photos to take and powerful stories to listen to and then tell.

Thanks for sticking around!

In a museum

On my birthday, the 10th of April, they told me that from the 15th of May, my pictures will be on display in a museum. Nine pictures from the series I shot for the Abrazos foundation in Peru, are part of an exhibition in museum Het Dolhuys in my hometown Haarlem. Last week we upgraded the exhibition even more to twelve pictures. The exhibition will be there till early September.

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From the same series another twelve photos are being exhibited in the Dr Leo Kannerhuis. This is a centre for autism in the Netherlands. Also ten pictures will be printed as a set of postcards we can sell. 

As I told you in the first newsletter an other exhibition is planned at the end of the year in “De Gang” gallery, again in Haarlem. This exhibition is tricky as the  photos for this one still have to be made.
The radio event “Serious Request” is organised in Haarlem this year as well, right at the time I will exhibiting my photos. Of course I’m going to combine these to events. 

And then there is the possibility for an exhibition of pictures  Joshua and I made during our time in Kenya. If this will happen, it will happen in San Fransisco. Fingers crossed!

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Photo/video workshop

One of the things Joshua and I have done in Nairobi is a video/photo workshop with some of the musicians. Peace Tones received five Flip cameras as a donation from Cisco. The older generation Flipcams work on AA batteries, which is very practical for the areas we’re working in. As the workshop attendees had little to no experience, it was just the basics we could teach them. Of course Flip cameras only do video, but some of their phones also shoot photo and because we only stuck with the basics, we could deal with both video and photo.

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A quick lesson in composition (rule of thirds), tips to keep the camera steady and how to zoom and pan gently. But probably the most important thing we taught them was: how do you deal with the light. So we shot in front of a window, to see how you can deal with back light and silhouette  We shot outside in the shade or in direct sunlight, to see what hard and soft shadows do. We even temporarily created a reflector with our posters to show them how that worked and how to soften the hard shadows that appear in direct sunlight. It’s fun to explain some of the things you’ve been doing on automatic pilot for a while. It actually makes you realise why you do the things in a certain manner or order. 

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It was amazing how eager and inquisitive the musicians were. They recorded everything.  The idea behind teaching these musicians about videography is that, in the future, they will be able to make videos and photos to promote their music. This way they can create a wider fan base and the work of Peace Tones is not only limited to the weeks we were there, but it can continue.

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this photo was taken by Joshua

Color vs Monochrome

As you all probably know by now, I love my black & white. The Monochrom gives me huge satisfaction every time. Tones are amazing, sharpness is unreal and it delivers the dramatic effect I love. It’s perfect for telling the story with no distractions of color what so ever. For example this short story on one of the people that auditioned this weekend in Kibera, one of the slums the projects of PeaceTones are held. His fluorescent pink shirt would have been a huge distraction. (in my opinion)

But I also brought the M240. First of all, I really wanted to bring two cameras. What would I be doing in Nairobi if I had only one and for some reason it would break down? But it’s nice to be able to shoot some video too. Check my next newsletter for that. Also, sometimes there is a situation where color becomes (part of) the story. For quite some time I’ve been avoiding those moments, or maybe I just didn’t see them. By using Instagram quite often this past week, I have rediscovered color again and I’m loving it. Don’t get me wrong, black & white still has my preference, but at least I’m allowing color in again. These few photo’s were taken in Babandogo, a different slum where we also organised some of the auditions. As I still like to do some postproduction, I’ve also been introduced to “Color effex pro” which works really nice once you’ve got it down. It’s in the same software package as “Silver effex pro” made by Nik software.   

Dynamic range

So it’s been five days already. Shooting here is quite hard I found out. During the day, light outside is very hard and bright, but shadows are nearly black. I find myself shooting at 1/4000 of a second and still having to stop down to f5.6 or even f8. A lot of the project on the other hand; meetings, rehearsals and video shooting, happens indoors. Then all of a sudden everything is dark. With only one light or a tiny window lighting the place, I find myself shooting at 1/30 or even 1/15 of a second with full opened lens and ISO sometimes up to 2000 or 2500.

The hardest part is when you’re shooting from the outside in or the inside out. The difference is huge and I have to pull all strings to manage and have detail in both. Still the Monochrom is doing an amazing job. Looking at my histogram, I try to shoot with the emphasis on the right side (opposed to what I was used to with my dSLR). As I can get some details back in the dark areas, but if some area is burned out, it’ll stay white and detail is completely lost.

Because of those bizar differences between light and dark, postproduction takes a bit more as wel. Some photo’s I had to shoot with certain settings so I wouldn’t have burned out areas, while the actual subject would then appear to be completely black (for example inside the house). In lightroom I would have to boost the black parts, sometimes with even 2 stops, to get the result I wanted. Sometimes that would meen using noise reduction, but to my surprise the Monochrom did deliver every time!

It’s also good to be here with Joshua, a photographer from San Francisco, who is a huge inspiration. Watching him work and studying his work, made me look at things with a different eye again. Daring to go for unusual angles and with a different perspective, I feel that I again can take things to a next level.

But of course there are also the shots you just want to take because they are there… When you have two Kenyan bands together in this old deserted building, you just have to make a group shot… This is where the 24mm Elmar again proved itself very useful!

First days in Nairobi

So I’m in Kenya now. The crowd funding worked and I have to thank some people for that… First of all Klein Haarlem, a foundation supporting young, creative entrepreneurs, for supporting and pushing me to go on this next journey. But also Aad, Marc, Mark, Ruha, Molly, Guy, Cees, Christine, Dean, Wilco, Remco, Laura, Ewoud, Lorette, Renée and of course my mother. 

As you might not have seen the video of the crowd funding or the one of Peacetones, you can check them following the links, to see what we’re going to do the upcoming weeks.

That being said, lets describe my first day. After a 10 hour flight arriving at 3:45 AM the first day was a day of relaxing and arranging some small stuff. Arranging a local sim card didn’t really work out and the festival we were supposed to visit was cancelled at the last minute. Unfortunately we found out by the time we got to the location. 

Also the flat tire that our guide had the day before my arrival was beyond repair. Basically it was a day where everything that could go wrong…. did go wrong. But, for some reason we had fun, the atmosphere was relaxed and we ended up having a wonderful day.

Today was somewhat different. After breakfast, we started with a special visit. Eric Wainaina, one of Kenya’s most famous musicians. We met him at his house and after talking with him he committed to helping Peacetones out with some of the workshops they’re planning in the shantytowns.

In the afternoon we picked up some small video cameras, that were sponsored by a Kenyan security company. Peacetones will donate these to the people joining the musical workshops and tomorrow, Joshua (an American photographer who’s also with us) and I will give a workshop on how to use it. Looking forward to it.

In the afternoon we witnessed a rehearsal of some musicians in Babandogo, one of the shantytowns. During this trip, Transcontinenta was kind enough to provide me a 24 mm Elmar (f3.8), I couldn’t have been more happy that it was in my bag as the room was small end completely filled with people. Even though you’re supposed to use an external viewfinder for this wide angle (which I didn’t bring) it worked like a charm.

After the rehearsal, right during the “golden hour” we walked back through the streets of Babandogo. This is what I love most…. wondering and wandering, talking to the people you meet and taking some great shots.

Newsletter 2

For the people who didn’t subscribe (yet) to my newsletter, here you can check it… both in Dutch or in English.

If you like what you read, don’t hesitate to subscribe so I can send you the next newsletter directly next month! 

A new year….

Wow, this was a nice first three weeks of the year. 

I did some nice portraits for the magazines, a lecture in Apeldoorn in working with the autistic children in Peru and I had a fun weekend at Noorderslag, one of the most important music festivals for Dutch bands on the verge of breaking through or famous and important for the popculture.

One of the portraits was of Dutch actor Victor Löw. For the magazine it had to be color, so I’ve shot it with the M, but I really love it in black and white. It was fun and easy working with him. Even though we only had about 45 minutes to do a shoot of about 4 different settings, I felt comfortable enough to still use the Leica. With some of the shots I used a bit of fill in with a Lastolite reflexion screen, but that wasn’t really necessary with this one.

During the lecture I spoke a lot about my work in Peru of last month, but also about working with the Leica and specially about working with silver effex pro. Most people by now, know this monochrome plugin for Lightroom or Photoshop that converts your color photos into black & white beautifully or enhances the shots of your Monochrom. I get a lot of questions on how I post process my work, well this is it for me. And the best (general) tip I can give for this workflow is: Don’t overdo it (specially with the structure sliders) and use the control points to make local adjustments instead of processing everything as one. It sounds simple, but apparently I helped a lot of people by telling them this. 

Besides this I introduced my new idea, of which you can check a preview here. It’s only work in progress but I’m very excited about it.

Last but not least, some of the pictures I took at Noorderslag. This was a festival I was invited to. Not to work, but just to have some fun. Of course I couldn’t leave my camera at home and I loved using the Monochrom this weekend to get a few shots at the edge of the stage. If you like to see  more of them check my flickr page.

Contests…

Entering your photos in a contest; it’s supposed to be a smart move, but I really don’t like it. Of course I understand it’s a good way to reflect on your work, sharpen your selecting skills and it’s a great way to get some free publicity or great prices IF you win.

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Would this photo, taken during my stay in Peru, have a chance of winning? I haven’t submitted it yet to any competition.

But that’s the whole problem; I hate selecting my own work… It’s not that I can’t see one photo is photographically better than te other, but the “feel” of a photo is also important. If not more important. This is where it gets tricky, as a lot of photos have more feel to me personally than to most viewers… I was there, I know the story! 

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This shot taken in Mumbai actually got a “mark of excellence” in the I-shot -it competition.

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This shot makes my heart beat faster, was used by Transcontinenta as a cover for a special edition yearbook, but hasn’t won anything in a competition…. yet.

When selecting just one photo it’s still relatively easy… you just pick one that makes your heart jump or that others like and repost a billion times on social media. You can still talk about taste and preference, but that’s just what it is.

It’s the series which give me the hard time. Most of the time they give you a restriction of X photos. And for some reason I always end up with X plus some, to tell the whole story. I guess this also is just a matter of perseverance and practice… so I’ve started to enter some of my work. 

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These are shots taken during a project with autistic children in Peru. I didn’t select these three for entering this serie in a contest. To see all the photos check here and decide which seven pictures you would send in…

I’m mainly entering competitions where there are actual jurors and no “social voting system”. On the one hand because this gets me actual feedback on what I’m doing and on the other hand so I don’t have to spam my entire network. Also I’m entering some competitions that actually cost money… I look at this as “learning tuition” that I’ve never spend on an actual course, school or training. 

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This picture I’ve never entered in a competition… still it got me some amazing publicity…

As for the publicity side of things; It’s always good to have people notice you and even blog about you… as you can check here, you might end up in one of those “best of the year” lists that come out by the end of the year. Thanks a lot for checking out my blog this year, have a great new years eve and hopefully see you all next year!

Parents association

Yesterday we had a gathering of families with an autistic child. They came together to get to know each other, talk, drink hot chocolate milk and have their kids play together, including the non autistic brothers and sisters. The idea behind it was to form a parenting association (I have no idea if that is te proper English term for it.)

It was a great afternoon and besides documenting the event, I was asked to make some family portraits in the tradition of Peru… very posed. It’s not what I normally do, but I loved the challenge. Especially as some of the autistic kids didn’t want to stand still or stand there with their parents. Therefor sometimes I had to improvise, but it all worked out.

In the mean time some of the kids decorated the place, making beautiful chalk drawings on the floor. Others played a game on the phone, or just sat in silence in a corner.